Lindenauer Lecture

View Past Speakers

The Marilyn R. Lindenauer Distinguished Speaker Series at Columbia University Irving Medical Center was established by Dr. S. Martin and Ms. Marilyn R. Lindenauer in 2013. The Speaker Series provides an opportunity for the Weinberg Family Cerebral Palsy Center to host lectures by medical professionals from around the world to discuss groundbreaking new ideas and emerging technologies related to the care of cerebral palsy patients. The lectureship is also an important component in helping to educate the broader medical community and foster greater awareness of the needs of cerebral palsy patients. We are grateful to the Lindenauer family and their friends for supporting our education mission.

Past Speakers

snapshots from the lecture

2019: Novel Roles of Placental Hormones in Newborn Brain Injury

Novel Roles of Placental Hormones in Newborn Brain Injury

Anna Penn, MD, PhD
Chief of Neonatology in the Department of Pediatrics at Columbia University (January 2020)

On November 7, the 2019 Marilyn R. Lindenauer Distinguished Speaker Series hosted Anna Penn, MD, PhD, who discussed “Novel Roles of Placental Hormones in Newborn Brain Injury” at the Vagelos Education Center at Columbia University Irving Medical Center (CUIMC).

Dr. Penn is a neonatologist and developmental neuroscientist at Children’s National Health System in Washington, D.C. She is an Associate Professor of Pediatrics at George Washington University School of Medicine, with appointments in the Children’s National Fetal Medicine Institute, Neonatology and the Center for Neuroscience Research. In January 2020, she will join Columbia University as the Chief of Neonatology in the Department of Pediatrics.

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2018 Lindenauer Lecture

2018: Cerebral Palsy and Genetics: Learning What We Don’t Know

Multidisciplinary Panel of Experts

  • Orthopedic Surgery
  • Pediatrics
  • Genomic Medicine
  • Pathology & Cell Biology
  • Obstetrics & Gynecology

On June 1, the 2018 Marilyn R. Lindenauer Distinguished Speaker Series hosted a panel of experts that discussed “Cerebral Palsy and Genetics: Learning What We Don’t Know” at the prestigious Faculty Club in Columbia University Irving Medical Center (CUIMC). The Cerebral Palsy and Genetics panel was moderated by David Roye Jr., MD, Executive Director, Weinberg Family CP Center, Department of Orthopedic Surgery and included experts in genomic medicine, pediatrics, pathology, OB/GYN, and orthopedics:

Over the last few years, studies have revealed that at least 30% of CP has a genetic basis. However, the suspicion is that even more CP cases have a genetic basis that we have not yet established. Our interest is to develop projects that will allow us to identify these important genetic relationships. The issues discussed by the panel will have important implications for patient care–“precision medicine” for CP. This was the first Lindenauer lecture to feature a panel of experts, presenting a multidisciplinary view into cutting-edge cerebral palsy and genetics research, and the discussion concluded with a brief Q&A with the audience.


2017 Lindenauer Lecture

2017: Systems Neurosciences Insights Into Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy

Jason Carmel, MD, PhD
Lab Director
Motor Recovery Laboratory
Burke Neurological Institute

On June 7, the 2017 Marilyn R. Lindenauer Distinguished Speaker Series hosted Jason Carmel, MD, PhD, a pediatric neurologist and neuroscientist, to discuss “Systems Neurosciences Insights Into Hemiplegic Cerebral Palsy” at the prestigious Faculty Club in Columbia University Irving Medical Center (CUIMC). Dr. Carmel’s talk focused on his work in restoring mobility in patients with hemiplegic cerebral palsy and presented diagrams and videos of successful attempts at retriggering connections in the brain’s damaged hemisphere to restore hand movement with targeted electrical stimulation.

About Dr. Carmel

Dr. Carmel is a graduate from the College of Physicians and Surgeons and completed a neurology and pediatrics residency at CUIMC. He is currently Assistant Professor of Neurology and Neuroscience at Weill Cornell Medicine. Dr. Carmel studies brain control of movement both in health and after injury. Using a combination of anatomy, physiology (brain mapping), and behavior, he has been able to identify the brain circuits that adapt to developmental brain injury.

As Director of the Motor Recovery Lab at the Burke Medical Research Institute, he uses activity-based therapies to promote recovery of function. These therapies include electrical stimulation and intensive behavioral training. He has demonstrated that stimulation of brain to spinal cord connections causes them to sprout, form functional connections, and restore motor skill. In addition to directing the research laboratory, the Burke Blythedale Pediatric Neuroscience Research Collaboration, which applies neuroscience advances to children with cerebral palsy. His goal as a physician-scientist is to translate the science of brain repair into better treatments for people living with impaired movement.


2016 Lindenauer Lecture

2016: Gaming/Interactive Computer Play and Cerebral Palsy–Let's Play!

Darcy Fehlings, MD
Chief, Division of Developmental Pediatrics
Professor, Department of Pediatrics
University of Toronto

The Weinberg Family Cerebral Palsy Center hosted Dr. Darcy Fehlings who spoke on “Gaming/Interactive Computer Play and Cerebral Palsy–Let’s Play!” on June 22, 2016 at the Donald F. Tapley Faculty Club at CUIMC.

About Dr. Darcy Fehlings

Dr. Darcy Fehlings is Head of the Division of Developmental Paediatrics and is a Professor in the Department of Paediatrics, at the University of Toronto. She is the inaugural holder of the Bloorview Children’s Hospital Foundation Chair in Developmental Paediatrics. Dr. Fehlings is the Senior Physician Director of the Child Development Program at Holland Bloorview Children’s Rehabilitation Hospital and provided medical leadership for a large ambulatory program for cerebral palsy and other neurodevelopmental disorders.

Dr. Fehlings is a Senior Clinician Scientist in the Bloorview Research Institute. Her research focuses on the innovation and evaluation of interventions for children with cerebral palsy. She is the lead investigator of an Ontario Brain Institute integrated neuroscience network focused on children with cerebral palsy (CP-NET) and leads the CP Discovery Project in the Canadian NeuroDevNet Networks of Centres of Excellence. Professor Fehlings was the president of the American Academy for Cerebral Palsy and Developmental Medicine (AACPDM) in 2015.


2015 Lindenauer Lecture

2015: Mobility and Child Development

James C. "Cole" Galloway, PT, PhD
Professor of Physical Therapy
University of Delaware 

The Weinberg Family Cerebral Palsy Center hosted Dr. James Galloway for the 2015 Marilyn R. Lindenhauer Lecture. He is a Professor in and Associate Chair of the Physical Therapy Department at the University of Delaware and an expert on pediatric mobility as it relates to children’s social, emotional, and cognitive development. Dr. Galloway invents assistive devices for children with motor impairments, including the popular “Go Baby Go!” cars. He was also featured in a TEDMED Talk in 2014 about mobility. The Marilyn R. Lindenauer Distinguished Speaker Series highlights groundbreaking ideas and emerging technologies related to the care of patients with cerebral palsy.

About Dr. James Galloway’s Go Baby Go!

Our group operates within the Pediatric Mobility Lab and Design Studio, Dept. of Physical Therapy, University of Delaware. Our lab is interested in the roles that a child’s brain, body, behavior, and environment plays in the development of exploratory behaviors. We focus on reaching, object play, sitting, walking and the various things children do in everyday life. The lab has been given funding from the National Institutes of Health, National Science Foundation, and Foundation for Physical Therapy.

A major focus of our day is on the parallel design and prototype production of commercial and DIY tech for play to be used by children and adults in the real world. Current projects/products include garments, toys, race cars, and harness environments. His group, which includes professionals and students from fashion, child development, neuroscience and engineering, has been known to accept NIH, NSF funding and donations.


2014 Lindenauer Lecture

2014: Role Modeling and Clinical Excellence: Interests of a Physician with Cerebral Palsy

Scott Wright, MD
Professor of Medicine
Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine

The Weinberg Family Cerebral Palsy Center at Columbia University launched a Distinguished Speaker Series with the inaugural event on June 12, 2014 featuring Dr. Scott Wright, Professor of Medicine at Johns Hopkins.

He discussed “Role Modeling and Clinical Excellence: Interests of a Physician with Cerebral Palsy.” A revered professor and mentor at Johns Hopkins, Dr. Wright has also been honored on a national level for developing innovative ways to transform medical education.

About Dr. Scott Wright

Scott Wright is a professor in the Department of Medicine at Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine. He received his MD from McGill University and he then completed his internal medicine residency training at the Montreal General Hospital. After pursuing fellowship training at Hopkins, he joined the faculty in 1997.

Dr. Wright’s contributions to the field of medical education, through his own research and the mentoring of others, have been published in leading biomedical research journals. In recognition of his research accomplishments, Dr. Wright was elected to membership in the American Society for Clinical Investigation.

Dr. Wright is the Deputy Director for Medical Education Research at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center and he serves as the director of the medical education track of the GIM fellowship at Hopkins. He is also the research mentor for the Hospitalist Division at Johns Hopkins Bayview Medical Center.

Dr. Wright has been providing longitudinal primary care to patients in Baltimore since 1995, and he serves as a teaching attending on the inpatient general medical service. For his teaching efforts, he was elected to membership in Alpha Omega Alpha. With colleagues, he launched the Miller-Coulson Academy of Clinical Excellence at Hopkins. Dr. Wright serves as Director of the Academy, which is committed to recognizing and promoting excellence in patient care.